The Conewago Inn Story

On the main road from York to York Haven, and on the Conewago Creek near the point where the creek meets the Susquehanna River, the Conewago Inn has offered fine dining and friendly service for decades. In its early days the York Haven Road was a main route from York and the southern states, and was traversed by a stagecoach line which brought many famous visitors. Revolutionary War statesmen the Marquis de Lafayette in 1825 and author Charles Dickens in 1842 were among those who passed within yards of where you sit today. Prior to and during the American Civil War, slaves escaping from the south were hidden in what is now the basement of the Inn as well as in a barn which stood across the road.

In later years, a trolley line brought visitors by the hundreds to Elm Beach Park, a stone’s throw away from the Conewago Inn, which became a popular stop for tourists who enjoyed the Inn’s food and beverages as well as hot baths and garage facilities. During this time, an outdoor stand sold firecrackers and souvenirs in front of the Inn and lavish banquets were held on the lawns at the side of the building. The deed to the main log building dates to 1860. The building served as a farm house until the early 1920’s when enterprising citizens took advantage of its prime location and established and inn named for the creek that flows nearby. Briefly named the Creekside Inn, the restaurant and tavern has since been known as the Conewago Inn. Enjoy your visit with us and let our family take care of your family!

Thomas & Sharon Roberts, Proprietors